Edition: Vol. 04, No. 06
Edition date: June 8, 2011

 

Important information from the Oregon Building Codes Division to local building departments.

BCD Office Closures

None

 
BCD Events

Understanding the Oregon Solar Installation Specialty Code
June 17: Eugene, Lane Community College

June 24: Bend, Central Oregon Community College

 
Board meetings

June 1: Mechanical Board

June 7: Board of Boiler Rules

June 16: State Plumbing Board

 
Public meetings and hearings

June 14: 2010 OSSC ADA Standards Committee

June 21: Rulemaking Hearings

June 28: 2010 OSSC ADA Standards Committee

 
 
 

News Updates - June 8, 2011

HB 3462 Plumbing and Solar PV Inspector
Training Course Participants

The application deadline for the first Plumbing and Solar PV training courses closed on June 1. Both training programs were limited to 30 participants each. The Building Codes Division received 16 applications for the solar PV program, enabling every applicant to participate. The Division received 39 applications for the plumbing program. The division worked to provide as many jurisdictions as possible with training slots and ultimately limited each jurisdiction to only two applicants. Applicants not selected for this initial course offering beginning June 20 can choose to be put on a waiting list for future course vacancies.

The Building Codes Division is now working to process the $200 payments for the selected applicants by Wednesday, June 15. After receiving payment, the division will e-mail information to each applicant for registering with Chemeketa Community College and beginning the online portion of the training programs. This online training must be completed between June 20 and July 25, and all applicants must begin their online coursework by July 4. Individuals not engaged in the online training by July 4 will be dismissed from the training program without a refund, and individuals on the waiting list for the training will be given the chance to participate.

As a brief reminder, the solar PV training program includes eight hours of online, self-paced training through Chemeketa Community College’s eLearn program, completion of four supervised fieldwork inspections with documentation provided to the Building Codes Division, and passage of a final examination. The plumbing training includes approximately 40 hours of online, self-paced training through Chemeketa Community College’s eLearn program, completion of 40 supervised fieldwork inspections with documentation provided to the Building Codes Division, and passage of a final examination. The plumbing training also includes a two to day in-person training session that will provide an opportunity for applicants to review the online training and receive additional key instruction related to this certification. The in-person training is tentatively set to be held in either Salem or Portland sometime in early August.

The Division is working to ensure that these certification training programs begin successfully on June 20 and is also already preparing to offer these training programs again in the fall, with a tentative start date of Sept. 26.

If you have any questions, contact Inspection Certification Specialist Tiffani Alexander at tiffani.k.alexander@state.or.us or 503-373-1248, or Policy Analyst Trevor Johnson at trevor.w.johnson@state.or.us or 503-373-1354.

Reach Code Moves Forward

On May 11, the Construction Industry Energy Board (CIEB) voted unanimously to move the commercial portions of Oregon’s first Reach Code forward to public hearing. The Mechanical Board’s approval of the mechanical provisions followed on June 1, and the Plumbing Board will consider the plumbing provisions on June 16. The boards have largely approved the code as recommended by the Reach Code Advisory Committee. There were a few changes at the board level. While buildings going through a third-party certification will generally be eligible for Reach Code certification, the board shied away from specifically listing approved programs. The board also struck provisions that would have increased the cost of wiring of a Reach Code compliant building. The commercial provisions will go to public hearing on Tuesday, June 21 at 10:00 a.m.

On May 25, the advisory committee wrapped up its work and completed its recommendations on the residential provisions. Those provisions are slated to go before the CIEB late next month, with an anticipated effective date of October 1. Both the residential and commercial provisions will be housed in a single Reach Code, the residential provisions will make up Chapter 13. While the commercial provisions will be available for viewing on the division’s website, and effective July 1, the printed copy is expected to be available by the end of the year.

Permit Requirements for Roof Replacement

The Building Codes Division will be reissuing Statewide Code Interpretation No: 93-19 Criteria for Building Permits when Reroofing Dwellings, effective July 1, 2011. This interpretation addresses replacement of a roof employing spaced sheathing where the new roofing material is installed over the spaced sheathing. Recently the division received questions regarding whether a permit is required for this type of installation. The division reviewed the statutory basis for this interpretation, going back to the legislative history on the original law. From this research, the division affirmed that the legislature clearly did not intend for a permit to be required when roofing is replaced unless it affects the structural integrity of the dwelling. ORSC Section R105.2(18) exempts the work unless the new roofing material exceeds 30 percent of the live load. A permit is not required unless more than 15 percent of the spaced sheathing is being removed, if rafters are being removed, replaced, or repaired, or if other structural repair is necessary.

Carbon Monoxide Detector Requirements

The division is reissuing its Statewide Code Interpretation on carbon monoxide detector requirements. After the initial issuance, the division received questions and concerns from local building officials. In response to that input, the division reviewed the information and analysis, and made some modifications.

The reissued interpretation clarifies that the person who is issued the permit is responsible for installation of the CO alarm. Previously, the interpretation stated the contractor was responsible to let the owner know of the requirement but did not specify who was responsible for installation.

The interpretation that a “new” source, not the replacement of an existing source, requires the installation of a carbon monoxide alarm has not been modified. Records of the code review committee and the board meetings where this code language was approved indicate that not all of the committee and board members understood the language to mean that replacement of existing sources would trigger the requirement for installation of a CO alarm. The language in the code, “adding a new source” expands the legislative requirement and expanding this even further through interpretation is not appropriate.

Code Updates

June 3, 2011 – Mid-cycle code adoption process begins for the 2010 Oregon Mechanical Specialty Code.

June 14, 2011 – 2010 Structural Specialty Code, ADA Standards Committee meetings begin. View the committee website for more information.

Mid-June – 2011 Oregon Residential Specialty Code is estimated to be available for purchase in mid-June.

July 1, 2011 – Oregon Reach Code, commercial provisions become effective. A read-only version will be available on the BCD website. Due to the October implementation of the residential provisions, the full code will not be available for purchase until the end of the year.

July 1, 2011 – 2011 Oregon Residential Specialty Code becomes effective. Ninety-day grace period ends Sept. 30, 2011.

July 1, 2011 – Mid-cycle code adoption process begins for the 2010 Oregon Structural Specialty Code. Notice to stakeholders will be posted.

July 1, 2011 – Mid-cycle code adoption process begins for the 2010 Oregon Energy Efficiency Specialty Code begins. Notice to stakeholders will be posted.

1% Training PV classes available in Eugene and Bend in June

The 1% Training program’s course Understanding the Oregon Solar Installation Specialty Code will be available in Eugene and Bend in June. The instructor for the courses is Ryan Mayfield. The course is an in-depth training opportunity intended to increase overall understanding of NEC and Oregon PV codes. This course provides participants with knowledge on the requirements of these codes to ensure consistent and uniform installation and inspection methods for PV systems. The course in Eugene will be held on June 17 and the Bend class will be on June 24. Please register soon for these courses.

For questions or more information please contact Sherri West, training coordinator, at 503-373-7509 or sherri.d.west@state.or.us.

Brown Bag Lunch Series

The Brown Bag Lunch series brings you Basics in Federal and State Flood Plain Management on Thursday, June 16, from noon to 1 p.m.
Specific practices and standards apply when buildings and structures are located in FEMA-mapped special flood hazard areas. In this presentation, Christine Shirley, the National Flood Insurance Program coordinator for the State of Oregon, will review FEMA’s terminology and regulations and show where FEMA’s flood hazard zone regulations are reflected in the Oregon building codes. She will talk about the relationship between Oregon building codes and local flood damage prevention municipal code. The session will close with a review of the consequences of flood hazard zone violations. Links to valuable resource material will be provided throughout the presentation. Register for this Brown Bag Lunch session today.

Guide to Charging Electric Vehicles at Home

Oregon is at the forefront of the move to electric transportation. A number of car manufacturers, including Nissan, Mitsubishi, and Chevrolet, have committed to making Oregon an early market for plug-in electric vehicles (EVs).

Since most charging of EVs is expected to be overnight in a homeowner’s garage, Building Codes Division (BCD) has just published an Oregon Smart Guide to EV Charging at Home. The EV guide provides some basic information on permitting and installing Level 1 (120 volts) or Level 2 (240 volts) home charging stations. You can download it from the BCD website or obtain hard copies of the brochure for distribution by contacting Gabrielle Schiffer, Green Building coordinator, at 503-373-7418 or gabrielle.m.schiffer@state.or.us.

To augment home charging and ease “range anxiety,” a network of public charging stations is also being built around the state, including fast charging stations along Interstate 5 as part of the West Coast Green Highway Partnership.

Enforcement

Summary of enforcement cases presented
to the Board of Boiler Rules

Summary report: These cases were resolved by the division's enforcement section without going to a contested case hearing. No action was required by the Board of Boiler Rules.

Summary of enforcement cases presented
to the Electrical and Elevator Board

Summary report: These cases were resolved by the division's enforcement section without going to a contested case hearing. No action was required by the Electrical and Elevator Board.

Final orders after hearing: These cases went to a contested case hearing. Each penalty assessment was reviewed and approved by the Electrical and Elevator Board.

Summary of enforcement cases presented
to the State Plumbing Board

Summary report: These cases were resolved by the division's enforcement section without going to a contested case hearing. No action was required by the State Plumbing Board.

License Suspensions

 


Published by the State of Oregon Building Codes Division.
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