Oregon OSHA Construction Depot

Safety and health newsletter for the Oregon construction industry

September 17, 2013

In this issue:

 

Aerial lifts and lanyards

aerial lift and lanyard

Are there any requirements covering the type of lanyard that I should use for fall protection on a boom lift or a scissor lift?

Answer

Although a personal fall-protection system is required on boom-supported elevating work platforms and vehicle-mounted elevating and rotating lifts, there are no requirements covering the type of lanyard you should use. A lanyard that prevents a worker from falling off the platform is preferable to one that stops, but does not prevent, a fall.

Below is a summary of the required fall protection for the most common types of aerial lifts:

Boom-supported elevating work platforms [ANSI A92.5 devices]: The platform must have a guardrail 42 inches (plus or minus three inches) high, a midrail, and toeboards at least four inches high. Each worker on the platform must use a personal fall-protection system that includes a body harness and lanyard attached to the boom or the platform.

Vehicle-mounted elevating and rotating lifts [ANSI A92.2 devices]: Platforms other than buckets or baskets must include guardrail systems with guardrails, midrails, and toeboards. Each person who works on a boom-supported platform must use a personal fall-protection system that includes a body harness and a lanyard attached to the boom or basket.

Manually propelled elevating work platforms [ANSI A92.3 devices]: The platform must have a guardrail 42 inches (plus or minus three inches) high, a midrail, and toeboards at least four inches high.

Self-propelled elevating work platforms and scissor lifts [ANSI A92.6 devices]: The platform must have a guardrail 42 inches (plus or minus three inches) high, a midrail, and toeboards at least four inches high.

Reprinting, excerpting, or plagiarizing any part of this publication is fine with us!

But remember: the information in this newsletter is intended to highlight safe work practices, but it does not replace Oregon OSHA workplace safety and health rules.

For information about Oregon OSHA services and answers to technical questions, call (503) 378-3272 or toll-free within Oregon, (800) 922-2689.